Feb 082015
 

After a phonecall recently a U K visitor, Quentin Black arrived at our property to see the South Island Kaka chicks specifically, and the parrot collection of both exotic and NZ native birds.’

He had been in the country on business, and learned of us through visiting Lindsay Hazley, Tuatara Curator at the Southland Museum, who is incidentally, our Charitable Trust Patron.

Quentin asked for our bank account number and a few days later put a substantial amount of money into it.

THANKYOU Quentin, your donation is most helpful and we really appreciate it.

 

Feb 032015
 

 In early October our kaka pair, Hannah and Casey hatched one chick from their four eggs, which were laid very soon after the birds getting together.  The egg took around 30 days to hatch and we waited with anticipation.  The male was very attentive, feeding the female both in the nest and out of it.  Kaka parents feeding

 Throughout the last three months we watched the chick grow, first in the nest and then when it emerged, fully feathered as big as its parents. It is now feeding well and on 3 February was taken by Russell and friends, to Orokonui Ecosanctuary, near Dunedin, where it will eventually fly free.  We think the bird is a male,  and it is very active and beautifully feathered.

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The female laid four eggs again and we are pretty sure three have hatched as of Wednesday, 14 January.  Of course it is far too early to say we have  reared three chicks but we are feeding the parents lots of goodies morning and night and hopefully they will cope with the increased feeding.  They are eating a lot of different food, and really like huhu grubs, so if you have any we would welcome them for our birds.  They love digging through old wood to get the grubs, which are a great source of protein.

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